Grades 6 (Age 11-12) to Grades 8 (Age 13-14)

The Middle School strives to meet the unique needs of Middle School students in their transition from elementary to high school. The essence of our Middle School program is the concept of educating and fostering the growth of “the whole child” and developing an increasing sense of personal and academic responsibility. To this end, learning is exploratory or experiential in nature, whereby learners are practitioners of their own learning. There are opportunities for both competitive and non-competitive sports and activities to promote the social and physical growth of each student. Inherent in our Middle School program is the goal of instilling a sense of belonging to the Middle School. Lincoln Middle School enrolls approximately 60 students in sixth through eighth grade.
 

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

Our school’s Social Studies vision reads: We strive to graduate students who understand the modern world by examining human endeavor through multiple perspectives across time, place, and discipline. We do this in order to inspire a shared responsibility to think, solve, and act toward a sustainable, just, and peaceful future. 6th Grade Humanities is a year-long, integrated Language Arts and Social Studies curriculum that seeks to develop students’ knowledge of themselves and the world around them by investigating past people and cultures, while making connections to a more modern context. Students begin this journey of discovery with an exploration of the self; one’s history, groups, values, beliefs, stories, and cultures. This study involves a look into stories and myths, as well as an exploration of some major world religions, namely Judaism, Christianity, Hinduism and Buddhism, while delving deeper into the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, India and Greece. The themes of social organization, culture and diversity continue in the form of the identification of positive character traits and the personal “heroes” that might possess these traits. Persistent social problems are investigated in a very local context, with students acting as change agents in a year-long service-learning project that specifically connects to our Social Studies curriculum. They also engage in a project-based learning project dubbed the “Super Surfboard Debate,” where students take on the guise of great historical figures to argue why they should return to the 21st Century and make the world a better place.

Simultaneously, another world of learning awaits – a world where students will learn to express their ideas and feelings about a subject in a variety of ways. As writers, their voices will continue to develop as they make the distinction between more personal journal-writing and poetry, to more organized paragraphs and essays; as readers, they will continue to learn how to analyze various, age-appropriate texts, while expanding their vocabulary; and, as a class, we will hopefully have a bit of fun along the way.

Language Arts classes will be quite structured and follow a similar daily routine. The first 15-20 minutes of the class will alternate between Sustained Silent Reading and Writing. Students will be involved in a year-long reading project offered through the Library and supported by in-class reading during this time. Thereafter, we will be engaged in a student-led “Mug-shot” lesson, where students identify grammatical, spelling, punctuation and word usage errors in a piece of writing that aligns with the Social Studies content. Vocabulary expansion is also focused on words from in-class texts, with the remainder of the class devoted to a specific piece of literature, writing development using the 6 + 1 traits of effective writing, or public speaking and listening skills. During this time, we will learn how to analyze, think about, and question a poem, short story or novel, whether as a class or in smaller literature circles. Moreover, students will learn how to identify various elements of literature and use them in their own writing. Use of The Writing Process will also be a focus, as well as identifying the 6+1 Traits of Writing and how students can use these traits to improve their writing.

Social Studies classes will be less structured, as they will depend on the lengths of projects and assignments. As implied earlier, throughout the year we will look at the following overarching themes:

  • Identity/Transitions: Me, My Place, My Groups: Students will look at essential questions like: How does belief influence action? How does culture shape who we are? What is diversity and how does it impact us? How is culture both a unifying and divisive force in human relations?
  • Change Agents: Super Surfboard Unit: Students will look at essential questions like: How can individuals make a difference? What does it take to change the world? How do we identify persistent social problems?
  • Geography & The Human Experience: Students will study the geographic, political, economic, religious, and social structures of various societies, with a focus on Mesopotamia, India and Greece. Some of the following essential questions will guide our learning: How do people interact with, adapt to, and alter their environment and vice-versa? How do we achieve sustainability? What is my role? Who do we believe and why?
LDavis_6Humanities_Syllabus_2014.pdfLDavis_6Humanities_Syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

Language Arts at Lincoln School is more than critical reading of fine literature and the development of written and verbal communication skills. It is more than just coming to class with your homework completed and participating in discussion; it is the education of the mind. According to the Irish poet William Butler Yeats, “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.” Education does not just stop at the textbook or computer screen. It carries into everyday life. It should inspire the soul for future actions and deeds. This class will ask students to think, feel, do, discuss, react, share, listen, evaluate, create, reevaluate and publish. We will work together as well as individually to nurture an understanding of what it really means to be an active and critical reader.

Course Structure

This year the seventh grade language arts class will be team taught by Mr. von Hollen and Ms Somerville. We will work to develop reading, writing, and verbal communication skills by focusing primarily on the skill of reading in varied genres including short stories, myths, novels, poetry and non-fiction. By studying the components of what constitutes good writing, students learn how to compose good pieces of writing themselves. Through analyzing books, students will learn to express themselves in writing, dialogue, and group conversation as well as develop their critical thinking skills.

Every day planned class activities will be varied. Classes will usually begin with daily language lessons addressing the mechanics and nuances of the English language. These lessons will cover grammar, punctuation, common Latin and Greek roots and frequently confused or misused words in the English language. All students will be held responsible for the content of these daily mini-lessons that require five to ten minutes of class time. There will be periodic quizzes on the content of these lessons.

Reading will be the central focus in language arts class because frequent reading creates stronger reading comprehension and in turn, more competent creative writers. This will be facilitated through the close examination of literature in whole class settings and in small group literature circles. Literature circles also provide a safe, stimulating, and creative environment for students to experiment with their analysis of literature.

Writing will also be part of the regular routine in language arts class. Students will have a choice to either maintain their personal writing in a traditional journal or on their laptop devices.

Assessment

Students’ progress is monitored through frequent formative assessments including written assignments, class participation, and quizzes covering essential comprehension and understanding of material. Final grades will be determined by summative assessments that include more formal assignments such as essays, long-term projects and presentations. Students will be expected to read nightly for a minimum of twenty minutes. Our class schedule will allow for much of our long term writing and project work to be completed in class if students use their time efficiently and effectively.

Supplies & Materials

  • Laptop Device
  • Planner
  • Binder, folders, notebooks
  • Pencil Case – with pencils, black & blue pens, erasers, highlighters, colored pencils
  • USB storage (optional)
dvonhollen_LA7_Syllabus 2014.pdfdvonhollen_LA7_Syllabus 2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

Language Arts at Lincoln School is more than critical reading of fine literature and the development of written and verbal communication skills. It is more than just coming to class with your homework completed and participating in discussions: it is the education of the mind. According to the Irish poet William Butler Yeats, “Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.” Education does not stop with the textbook or computer screen. It carries into everyday life. Not only that, it is something that should inspire the soul for future actions and deeds. This class will ask you to think, feel, do, discuss, react, share, listen, evaluate, create, reevaluate and publish. We will work together as well as individually to nurture an understanding of what it really means to be a scholar and a compassionate global citizen.

Course Structure

In eighth grade language arts, we will continue building upon the foundations we established in seventh grade language arts. We will examine short stories, fiction, non-fiction, poetry and graphic novels. Through analyzing literature in varied formats, students will learn to express themselves in writing, dialogue, and group conversation more fluently and effectively.

Class activities will be varied as they were in seventh grade. We will examine some reading selections as a whole class and also use literature circles to facilitate the study of literature in small groups.

Over the course of the year, students will work on short and long-term projects. In addition to more casual daily written assignments, students will be expected to compose multiple drafts of their own critical and creative writing.

Assessment

Students’ progress is monitored through frequent formative assessments including daily written assignments, class participation, and quizzes covering essential comprehension and understanding of material. Final grades will be determined by summative assessments that include more formal assignments such as essays, long-term projects and presentations.

Students will be expected to read nightly for a minimum of twenty minutes. Our class schedule will allow for much of our long term writing and project work to be completed in class if students use their time efficiently and effectively.

Supplies

Students should bring to class daily:

  • Their laptop devices
  • Folders and notebooks
  • Pencil Case – with pencils, black & blue pens, erasers, highlighters, colored pencils
dvonhollen_LA8_syllabus 2014.pdfdvonhollen_LA8_syllabus 2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

Lincoln's Grade 6 Mathematics is taught through a sequence of connected problems in an inquiry-based classroom, using Connected Mathematics 2 (CMP2), a standards-based and problem centered curriculum. We will work to develop three mathematical learning strands: Number and Operations, Geometry and Measurement, and Data Analysis over 7 units of study.

Strand: Units

Number and Operations: Prime Time, Bits and Pieces I, II, and III

Geometry and Measurement: Covering and Surrounding, Shapes and Designs

Data Analysis: Data around us (when time allows)

djohnson_g6math_course_syllabus_2014.pdfdjohnson_g6math_course_syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

For many Grade 8 students, this year they learn Algebra I and move to Geometry in Grade 9.

Not all students are ready for Algebra I, so Lincoln School must also provide Grade 8 Mathematics topics, usually in the same class. The CMP2 program provides the basis of this. In its first implementation, Grade 8 students started with Moving Straight Ahead. In 2012-13, we will introduce that unit in Grade 7, where it belongs, and the Grade 8 class should begin with a review of negative number operations and Thinking with Mathematical Models, the unit on Linear and Inverse Functions.

djohnson_g7math_course_syllabus_2014.pdfdjohnson_g7math_course_syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

For many Grade 8 students, this year they learn Algebra I and move to Geometry in Grade 9.

Not all students are ready for Algebra I, so Lincoln School must also provide Grade 8 Mathematics topics, usually in the same class. The CMP2 program provides the basis of this. In its first implementation, Grade 8 students started with Moving Straight Ahead. In 2012-13, we will introduce that unit in Grade 7, where it belongs, and the Grade 8 class should begin with a review of negative number operations and Thinking with Mathematical Models, the unit on Linear and Inverse Functions.

djohnson_g8math_course_syllabus_2013-2.pdfdjohnson_g8math_course_syllabus_2013-2.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

Middle School ESOL is a personalized English language program designed to meet the needs of individual English language learners. The academic goal of the ESOL program is to help students build the language skills they need to succeed in life.

The program addresses specific receptive (listening and reading) and the productive (speaking and writing) skills within the context of the core subjects at each grade level, as well as ESOL contexts, and the process of inquiry, evaluating, communicating and reflecting on work are elements that are used daily. Throughout the year, students will become proficient in using key reading and writing strategies, as well as learning to self-asses themselves. To students will be offered academic support for their other classes and some time may be spent in class working with different subjects.

Our writing focuses on correct grammar usage, word choice, vocabulary building, sentence fluency, correcting and editing, understanding and using each aspect of the writing process. Students will practice correct pronunciation, while reading aloud in class. Presentations will be a regular part of the class and students will receive and give constructive feedback. Depending on the need, each week, there will be a different grammatical focus in class.

An important element of the ESOL program is building “language transfer knowledge,” which is the practice of reading the same content in English as well as in the child’s mother-tongue. The aim of this practice is to help learners to acquire a better understanding of content.

cdascalu_ESOL MS_Syllabus_2014.pdfcdascalu_ESOL MS_Syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

The MS French 1 course is an introduction course that focuses on the three modes of communication—interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive—and ensures that students become proficient in the five skill areas. Students will learn idiomatic and natural expression while grammar exercises will help them build proficiency. They will also develop reading skills and learn to appreciate literary writing. Activities will move from mechanical exercises to more creative and open-ended projects. Finally, essential questions will mold all the learning. Because paired, small group, and cooperative group activities are at the heart of today’s student-centered class- room, students will be offered many opportunities to work with their classmates on activities and projects that have clear guidelines and expectations. Students will thus assume a more active role in their learning as they will focus on how to learn as well as how to communicate in French. Opportunities for critical thinking will be found throughout the course.

kemeriau_MSFrench1_course_syllabus_2014.pdfkemeriau_MSFrench1_course_syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Pages: classroom.google.com

About the Course

The MS French 2 course is an intermediate course which leads students with a previous experience in French to a deeper understanding of the language. It focuses on the three modes of communication—interpersonal, presentational, and interpretive—and ensures that students become proficient in the five skill areas. Students will learn idiomatic and natural expression while grammar exercises will help them build proficiency. They will also develop reading skills and learn to appreciate literary writing. Activities will move from mechanical exercises to more creative and open-ended projects. Finally, essential questions will mold all the learning. Because paired, small group, and cooperative group activities are at the heart of today’s student-centered class- room, students will be offered many opportunities to work with their classmates on activities and projects that have clear guidelines and expectations. Students will thus assume a more active role in their learning as they will focus on how to learn as well as how to communicate in French. Opportunities for critical thinking will be found throughout the course.

kemeriau_MSFrench2_course_syllabus_2014.pdfkemeriau_MSFrench2_course_syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com and Weebly

About the Course

Middle School French 3 class focuses on continuing and developing basic and more advanced language skills (listening, reading, writing and speaking) and grammatical structures.

Main aspects of French culture are introduced to allow students to acquire an appreciation of the customs, traditions and expressions of the French speaking world. By introducing the French language through culture (history, art, news, etc) students will be able to make important interdisciplinary connections.

Objectives of this course are to:

1. Communicate in the target language.

2. Speak with understandable pronunciation and syntax within the limits of studied vocabulary and grammar.

3. Write for communication using clear, grammatically correct sentences.

4. Listen and read for comprehension within the limits of studied vocabulary.

5. Broaden students’ cultural background by studying, researching and presenting information about the products and practices of the target country or countries.

6. Use information acquired from the study of world language to make connections with other disciplines.

7. Seek to compare new information about language and culture to student's own culture to look for similarities and differences.

8. Make world language part of student's community by using it within the school on a daily basis in class and outside of school for personal fulfillment (films, short stories, current events, field trips, etc.).

The goal of this course is to move students from novice to intermediate level by providing interpersonal (speaking-listening or writing-reading), interpretative (reading, listening, viewing), and presentational (writing, speaking, representing visually) communication.

mpimentel_MSFrench3_syllabus_2014.pdfmpimentel_MSFrench3_syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

This is an introductory course that encourages students to embrace the Spanish language and all the Hispanic cultures as they learn through communicative activities by following the best practices of Lincoln School’s World Language Standards. This class also blends the underlying principles of the five C’s (Communication, Cultures, Connections, Comparisons, Communities) with features and strategies tailored specifically to build students’ speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Students are given the tools to express themselves in the target language through imitation, initiate meaningful interactions with their classmates, and establish a strong foundation to become effective communicators in Spanish.

Students use freshly presented vocabulary as a new code to express basic grammar structures and participate in the context of specific thematic units. They get involved by personalizing the contexts by comparing them to their own experiences. Once students see that Spanish is a tool for expressing their own ideas, they bridge their exposure with conversations in accurate cultural contexts for effective training in both comprehension and personal communication. Students discern the culture of specific Hispanic regions through short informational reading texts. Then, in each unit a formal presentation of relevant grammar concepts along with interactive activities help build confidence, fluency, and accuracy. Students actively engage in a variety of learning situations, which include: dialogues and skits, cooperative learning groups, personal presentations, games, and various full-class interactive exercises. There are regularly announced tests and/or projects to assess understanding of and ability to actively apply the material. Students study the following grammar concepts: gender of nouns, article/adjective/verb agreement, subject pronouns, regular and irregular verbs in the present tense, stem-changing verb conjugations, possession, and word order for statements and questions. Students expand awareness of the Spanish-speaking world via current events, music, and other cultural expressions.

Students should be prepared to be active learners, participating fully in individual and group work, as well as class discussions, and using the covered concepts when completing assignments.

fvonhollen_MS Spanish 1_syllabus 2014.pdffvonhollen_MS Spanish 1_syllabus 2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

In MS Spanish 2 the target language is the primary vehicle for classroom communication as the course builds on previously learned skills and emphasizes increased accuracy. Focus is placed on improvement of the students’ pronunciation and comprehension of both written and spoken Spanish. Students use freshly presented vocabulary as a new code to express what they already know including basic grammar structures and participate in the context of specific thematic units. They get involved by personalizing the contexts by comparing them to their own experiences. Once students see that Spanish is a tool for expressing their own ideas, they bridge their exposure with conversations in accurate cultural contexts for effective training in both comprehension and personal communication. Students discern the culture of specific Hispanic regions through short informational reading texts. Then, in each unit a formal presentation of relevant grammar concepts along with respective activities help build confidence, fluency, and accuracy.

Through more advanced and extended reading, writing, listening, speaking, and cultural exploration in scaffolding progression, students synthesize and apply all their skills for a rich, personalized experience of Spanish. Students actively engage in a variety of learning situations, which include: dialogues and skits, cooperative learning groups, personal presentations, games, and various full-class interactive exercises. During the course, students continue their progress toward mastery of more complex grammar/syntax, including: the recent past, object pronouns, stem-change verbs; comparison of adjectives; regular informal affirmative commands; and conjugation of regular and irregular verbs. The emphasis on vocabulary expansion enables the students to better negotiate communicative tasksStudents continue to develop awareness of the Spanish-speaking world via current events, music, and other cultural expressions. There are regularly announced tests and/or projects to assess understanding of and ability to actively apply class material.

Students should be prepared to be active learners, participating fully in individual and group work, as well as class discussions, and using the covered concepts when completing assignments.

fvonhollen_MS Spanish 2_syllabus2014.pdffvonhollen_MS Spanish 2_syllabus2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

Music Foundations is designed for beginning musicians at Lincoln School. This course has no prerequisites and is best suited for grade 6 students at Lincoln School. In this course, students will be exposed to the diverse spectrum of music. Students will obtain basic knowledge in music theory. This includes: musical literacy, rhythmic equations, and musical terminology. Students will apply music theory knowledge across instrumental and vocal performance. 

Students will gain a basic understanding and beginning skill set in instrumental music. Students will learn instrument care and maintenance, healthy posture, healthy breathing, producing a characteristic tone quality, developing effective practice techniques,

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

The Middle School Physical Education program aims to develop physically healthy and literate individuals who have the knowledge, skills and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity and holistic wellbeing. The course provides students with the opportunity to experience, and grow within, a safe learning environment that emphasizes positive participation and self challenge as well as personal and social responsibility - key characteristics of a physically literate individual. Students explore a variety of sports, games and fitness activities that serve to promote leadership, teamwork and cooperation, motor skill and technical development, physical fitness, knowledge of concepts, strategies, and rules, and an appreciation of the importance of exercise for a healthy lifestyle.

Physical Education units are taught using the “Teaching Games for Understanding” approach, which teaches game form, game appreciation, tactical awareness, decision making, skill development, and game performance though the use of differentiated and modified games and activities that allow for student-centered learning and development.

The Middle School Health Education program provides students with the opportunity to examine relevant health information, explore personal attitudes, and demonstrate healthy decision-making in a safe and nurturing environment that promotes discussion and project-based learning. Students are encouraged to take responsibility for the choices they make and are made to understand how those decisions affect their holistic health and wellbeing. The grade six course is developed around the five keys of physical health – exercise, diet, rest, hygiene, and personal safety – which are explored through a variety of units and applied by students to provide meaningful and authentic learning experiences.

sdavis_PEH6_syllabus_2014.pdfsdavis_PEH6_syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

The Middle School Physical Education program aims to develop physically healthy and literate individuals who have the knowledge, skills and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity and holistic wellbeing. The course provides students with the opportunity to experience, and grow within, a safe learning environment that emphasizes positive participation and self challenge as well as personal and social responsibility - key characteristics of a physically literate individual. Students explore a variety of sports, games and fitness activities that serve to promote leadership, teamwork and cooperation, motor skill and technical development, physical fitness, knowledge of concepts, strategies, and rules, and an appreciation of the importance of exercise for a healthy lifestyle.

Physical Education units are taught using the “Teaching Games for Understanding” approach, which teaches game form, game appreciation, tactical awareness, decision making, skill development, and game performance though the use of differentiated and modified games and activities that allow for student-centered learning and development.

The Middle School Health Education program provides students with the opportunity to examine relevant health information, explore personal attitudes, assess influences and risks, and demonstrate healthy decision-making in a safe and nurturing environment that promotes discussion and project-based learning. Students are encouraged to take responsibility for the choices they make and are made to understand how those decisions affect their holistic health and wellbeing. The grade seven course aims to be as responsive as possible to the distinct needs of grade seven students, with particular focus on the physical, social, mental and emotional developments that occur during puberty and early adolescence. These themes are explored through a variety of units and applied by students to provide meaningful and authentic learning experiences.

sdavis_PEH7_syllabus_2014.pdfsdavis_PEH7_syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

The Middle School Physical Education program aims to develop physically healthy and literate individuals who have the knowledge, skills and confidence to enjoy a lifetime of healthful physical activity and holistic wellbeing. The course provides students with the opportunity to experience, and grow within, a safe learning environment that emphasizes positive participation and self challenge as well as personal and social responsibility - key characteristics of a physically literate individual. Students explore a variety of sports, games and fitness activities that serve to promote leadership, teamwork and cooperation, motor skill and technical development, physical fitness, knowledge of concepts, strategies, and rules, and an appreciation of the importance of exercise for a healthy lifestyle.

Physical Education units are taught using the “Teaching Games for Understanding” approach, which teaches game form, game appreciation, tactical awareness, decision making, skill development, and game performance though the use of differentiated and modified games and activities that allow for student-centered learning and development.

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

The Middle School Health Education program provides students with the opportunity to examine relevant health information, explore personal attitudes, assess influences and risks, and demonstrate healthy decision-making in a safe and nurturing environment that promotes discussion and project-based learning. Students are encouraged to take responsibility for the choices they make and are made to understand how those decisions affect their holistic health and wellbeing. The grade eight course aims to be as responsive as possible to the distinct needs of grade eight students, with particular focus on personal responsibility, risk assessment and decision making in relation to the socio-emotional, mental, physical, and sexual developments that occur during puberty and early adolescence. These themes are explored through a variety of units and applied by students to provide meaningful and authentic learning experiences.

sdavis_PEH8_syllabus_2014-15.pdfsdavis_PEH8_syllabus_2014-15.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

Grade 6 Science takes students on an exploration of questions that are related to issues facing Nepal today and through those questions explores major themes and topics from the main disciplines of science. This course provides a basic introduction into the process of science and how scientists use questions and experimentation to help develop a broader understanding of the world around us. Students will also develop their comfort with the scientific reporting process as well as their ability to use scientific tools.

Course Structure

Students in Grade 6 Science will explore three main questions about Nepal: How is Nepal effected by climate change, Why is Nepal vulnerable to Earthquakes, and Why are the plants and animals in Nepal different from those in North America or Africa?

The course is also structured around a central strand that will be explored through the essential questions that frame each unit. Grade 6 will examine the concept of change over time throughout this year and this core strand will link units of study.

Major concepts and themes explored in Grade 6:

  • Seasons, weather and climate and measurement weather
  • Animals, ecosystems, habitats and the impact of climate change.
  • Tectonic plates, continental drift and dynamics of the Earth
  • Tectonic plate boundaries, plate movement and earthquakes
  • Evolution, speciation and survival of the fittest
phennigar_science6_syllabus_2014.pdfphennigar_science6_syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

Grade 7 Science takes students on an exploration of questions that are related to issues facing Nepal today and through those questions explores major themes and topics from the main disciplines of science. This course provides an in depth look at experimental design with focus on variables and how scientists use questions and experimentation to help develop a broader understanding of the world around us. Students will continue to develop their proficiency with the scientific reporting process as well as their ability to use sophisticated scientific tools.

Course Structure

Students in Grade 7 Science will explore three main questions about Nepal: How is Nepal affected by climate change (specifically in terms of its water resources), Why is Nepal vulnerable to Earthquakes, and Why is Nepal in an energy crisis?

The course is also structured around a central strand that will be explored through the essential questions that frame each unit. Grade 7 will examine the concept of transfer of energy throughout this year and this core strand will link units of study.

Major concepts and themes explored in Grade 7:

  • Electrons, electricity and circuits
  • Electricity generation, usage and alternative forms of energy
  • Watersheds, erosion, water pollution, water quality monitoring
  • Water borne diseases and the human immune system
  • Newton’s laws of motion and how they relate to earthquake
phennigar_science7_syllabus_2014.pdfphennigar_science7_syllabus_2014.pdf

Course Web Page: classroom.google.com

About the Course

Grade 8 Science takes students on an exploration of questions related to issues facing Nepal today; through those questions students explore major themes and topics from the main disciplines of science.

This course provides an in-depth look at experimental design with focus on variables and controlling sources of error in experimentation, to help develop a broader and more analytical understanding of the world around us. Students will continue to develop their proficiency with the scientific reporting process with focus on language and voice as well as their ability to use sophisticated scientific tools.

Course Structure

Students in Grade 8 Science will explore three main questions about Nepal: How is Nepal affected by climate change, Why is Nepal vulnerable to earthquakes, and What makes us human?

The course is structured around a central strand that is explored through the essential questions that frame each unit. Grade 8 will examine the concept of matter, motion and energy throughout this year and this core strand will link units of study.

Major concepts and themes explored in Grade 8 include:

  • Phases of matter, Increases and decreases of energy, global weather systems, heating and cooling of gases, climate change, glaciation
  • Waves and wave motion, sound waves vs earthquake waves
  • Architecture and designing earthquake resistant buildings
  • Heredity, genetics and reproduction
phennigar_science8_syllabus_2014.pdfphennigar_science8_syllabus_2014.pdf